Movie Review: Bombay Talkies

425

Indeed the best raconteurs have come together to tell us four short stories that move our heart. Bombay Talkies is a Indian anthology film consisting of four short films, a joint project by 4 different directors. The film released on May 3, 2013, coinciding with and celebrating the centenary year of Indian cinema and the beginning of a new era in modern cinema. It was also screened at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.[divider ]More::>[/divider]

The film opens with Karan Johar’s first story (Ajeeb Dastaan Hai Yeh) which deals with a troubled marriage. The life of tabloid editor (Rani Mukherjee) alters with this new entrant (Saqeeb Salim), an intern. The character of Saqeeb is out loud and proudly gay. Randeep Hooda on the other hand is married to Gayatri (Rani Mukherji) and is a closet case. The tension between the two (Randeep & Saaqeeb) is quite expressively portrayed. Karan Johar has treated homosexuality with maturity and has gone beyond the stereo typical portray of characters. In his previous ventures, the topic of same sex relations have got in a humorous angle to the plot, but this time it has been given a different treatment.

The second story (Star) is of a chawl residing Mumbaikar. He has a loving wife, bed ridden daughter and add to the spectators muse, he has an emu who refuses to lay eggs. In all this turmoil, the main character is finding a job for himself. The story unfolds as the day progresses. A special mention of the scene of a father telling his daughter a story is most memorable scene of this story. The Banerjee-Siddiqui combination compliments the story wonderfully.

The third story (Sheila Ki Jawani) is directed by Zoya Akhtar, whose story is of a little boy who aspires to be a dancer. But the father has other plans for his child. He wants his child to play sports (football) like any other boy who grows up to a man, and not the effeminate kinds. This story explores the societal pressures and the parental expectations cause a friction within the family members. The young boy and his relationship with sister definitely wins the audiences heart with his innocence.

The final story (Murabba) is of a person from UP whose is in pursuit of his father’s wish, which is to get Amitabh Bacchan the superstar to taste the “murraba”. He succeeds in doing so, but while coming back an unfortunate event takes place, which creates a humorous edge to the story.

All the stories are not interlinked to each other, yet this mosaic structure leaves you quite mesmerized. It is really a pleasure to see all these great artistes and the directors who have to masterpieces to their name, coming together on one screen.

All the stories are not interlinked to each other, yet this mosaic structure leaves you quite mesmerized. It is really a pleasure to see all these great artistes and the directors who have to masterpieces to their name, coming together on one screen. All the stories are beautifully scripted. Each story has something to take away. Each story has a scene which stays in the spectator’s mind, like the opening scene of Karan Johar’s film, the moment where the Amitabh eats the murabba and the scene where the sister saves her younger brother from getting scolded by their dad.

Cinema is a reflection of us and we are the reflection of cinema.

Surely Indian cinema is celebrating its 100th anniversary and indeed the attempt of Bombay Talkies will stay close to my heart. After all, cinema is a reflection of us and we are the reflection of cinema.

ADS

1 Comment
  1. Aamir says

    Well in the middle somewhere I thought this is a review for 4 movies…lol….anyways good job.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.